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Richard Dove WHITTAKER

Main CPGW Record

Surname: WHITTAKER

Forename(s): Richard Dove

Place of Birth: Skipton, Yorkshire

Service No: 267013

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 32

Date of Death: 1918-02-28

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: G. 3.

CWGC Cemetery: POLYGON WOOD CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Richard Dove Whittaker was the son of Edward and Ann Whittaker, née Dove and brother of Private James Willie Whittaker (265760) (q.v.). Their father was born at Skipton and mother at Birstwith, Yorkshire.

1891 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 35, Rowland Street - Richard D. Whitaker, aged 5 years, born Skipton, son of Edward and Ann Whitaker.

1901 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 35, Rowland Street - Richard D. Whittaker, aged 15 years, born Skipton, son of Edward and Ann Whittaker.

1911 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 28, Devonshire Street - Richard Whittaker, aged 25 years, born Skipton, son of Edward and Ann Whittaker.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Richard D. Whittaker, 267013, West Riding Regiment.

See also: ‘Guiseley Terriers: A Small Part in The Great War - A History of the 1/6th Battalion, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment’ by Stephen Barber (2018).

Photograph: 'Yorkshire Rugby Football Union - In Memoriam 1914-19'.

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

WHITTAKER, Richard Dove, aged 32, West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whittaker, 28, Devonshire Street, Skipton, died of wounds.

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Private Richard Dove WHITTAKER

Private Richard Dove WHITTAKER

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: WHITTAKER

Forename(s): Richard Dove

Born: Skipton, Yorks

Residence:

Enlisted: Skipton

Number: 267013

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 1/6th Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 28/02/18

Died How: Died of wounds

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: WHITTAKER

Forename(s): Richard Dove

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 267013

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 1st/6th Bn.

Age: 32

Awards:

Died Date: 28/02/1918

Additional Information: Son of Mr. and Mrs. Whittaker, of 28, Devonshire St., Skipton, Yorks. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: UNTIL THE DAY DAWNS)

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View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

15 September 1916

CRAVEN AND THE WAR – BURIED IN A DUG-OUT

Private Richard Dove Whittaker of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, and son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whittaker, of 28, Devonshire Street, Skipton, was buried in a dug-out on September 5th through the bursting of an enemy shell, and received injuries to his back. He was safely got out and removed to a hospital at Boulogne, where he is now progressing satisfactorily.

08 March 1918

WHITAKER – Died from wounds received in action, Private Richard D. Whitaker, West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whitaker, 28, Devonshire Street, Skipton, aged 32 years.

08 March 1918

SKIPTON SOLDIER FATALLY WOUNDED

Private Richard Dove Whitaker, West Riding Regiment, one of the three soldier sons of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whitaker, 28 Devonshire Street, Skipton, has died from wounds in the head caused by a shell bursting in a dugout. In a letter to his parents, Private James Whitaker says that his brother and his mate were cooking at the time the shell burst. The other man was killed instantly and his brother died directly he arrived at the dressing station. Private Whitaker, who was 32 years of age, had been at the Front 21 months. He was formerly a warp dresser at Messrs. Firth and Moorhouse’s mill.

28 February 1919

WHITTAKER – In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. Richard Dove Whittaker, of the l/6th Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment, who was killed in action February 28th, 1918.

No one knows what the parting cost,
But God has gained what we have lost.

From Father and Mother, and Brother in Italy.

23 February 1923

ODDFELLOWS’ WAR MEMORIAL

UNVEILING CEREMONY AT A SKIPTON LODGE

OVER 200 WHO SERVED

There was a large attendance of local members of the Independent Order of Oddfellows at the Friendly Societies’ Hall, Skipton, on Saturday afternoon, on the occasion of the unveiling of a war memorial to the members of the Loyal Traveller’s Friend Lodge, I.O.O.F, M.U., who fell in the war.

The Memorial takes the form of a beautifully designed scroll within an oak frame with a glass front, the work of Mr. H. Spencer, junr., and it bears the inscription:–

LOYAL/TRAVELLER’S FRIEND LODGE,/SKIPTON DISTRICT ./I.O.O.F. ROLL OF HONOUR M.U./OF/THOSE MEMBERS OF THIS LODGE WHO FOUGHT FOR THEIR KING AND COUNTRY TO UPHOLD THE SACRED CAUSES OF BROTHERHOOD AND HUMANITY IN THE GREAT WAR, 1914–1918.

Below the inscription are the names of 173 members who served in the war, and of the 40 members who were killed. The names of the fallen occupy a central position on the scroll, and above them are the following words:–

IN MEMORIAM
OF THOSE WHO MADE THE
SUPREME SACRIFICE.
THEIR HEARTS ARE LIFTED UP
THEIR HEARTS
THAT HAVE FOREKNOWN
THE UTTER PRICE,
THEIR HEARTS BURN
UPWARD AS A FLAME
OF SPLENDOUR AND OF
SACRIFICE

The names of the fallen are as follows:– H. Armstrong, J.J. Brown, J. Barrett, Robt. Brown, W.W. Bell, A. Clayton, W.H. Coles, T.C. Chew, Tom Downes, T.M. Drummond, Jos. Emmott, Thos. Edmondson, J. Easterby, F. Gallagher, J.W. Garwood, G.E. Godwin, S.J. Hargreaves, M. Hargreaves, A. Hebden, J. Hebden, A. Hawkswell, T.E. Inman, M. Lund, R.C. [R.G.] Metcalfe, Hbt. Maudsley, Hy. Maudsley, A.J. Pimnock [Pinnock], H.Y. [Harry] Riley, T.W. Storey, J.H. Stewart, R. Spencer, J.W. Shuttleworth, Wm. Tempest, Hbt. Thompson, Fred Thornton, J.W. Varley, John Ward, J.A. Whittaker, J.W. Whittaker, and R.D. Whittaker.

The Unveiling Ceremony

The unveiling ceremony was presided over by Bro. Thos. Bellamy, and was performed by Bro. Amos Culpan, Prov. C.S., and a simple service included the singing of the hymns, ‘O God our help’ and Kipling’s Recessional, ‘God of our fathers,’ and the reading of a portion of Scripture, and the offering of a prayer by Bro. James Greenwood, of Bradford, and formerly of Skipton.

Bro. Bellamy observed that those members of the Lodge whom they were met to honour went into battle, suffered untold privations, and, in many cases, made the supreme sacrifice. They gave their lives in defence of their homes and their country. Further than that, they gave their lives for justice and freedom, and in order that we might live. It was the duty of Oddfellows, equally as much as other sections of the community, to do everything within their power to make the country better for that sacrifice. “In the time of our prosperity,” concluded Bro. Bellamy, “never let us forget those who served us in the time of our adversity.”

A Lesson of the War

Prior to unveiling the memorial, Bro. Culpan described the ceremony he had been asked to perform as one not unattended by sorrow. It was an occasion upon which one felt a desire to make their Order better for the sacrifice of its members, and to extend the true spirit of brotherhood. In nearly 4,000 of their Lodges they would find a roll of honour. Over 22,000 of their members made the supreme sacrifice, and thousands of others were ruined and shattered in health and without prospects for the future. Each and all of them ought to perform some daily service that would make the sacrifice of those men worth while. One result of the terrible ordeal of 1914 to 1918 was the creation of a better feeling between men, and a desire to break down the class barriers that formerly existed. That was one of the great lessons of the war.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

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West Yorkshire Pioneer Logo

15 September 1916

SKIPTON SOLDIER INJURED

Private Richard Dove Whittaker, of the West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whittaker, of 2 Devonshire Street, Skipton, was buried in a dug-out on September 5th. When got out he was found to have received injuries to his back, and he is at present in hospital at Boulogne, where he is said to be progressing favourably.

08 March 1918

WHITAKER – Died of wounds, Pte. Richard Dove Whitaker, of the West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whitaker, of 28, Devonshire Street, Skipton, aged 33.

08 March 1918

SKIPTON

Pte. R.D. Whitaker Dies of Wounds

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whitaker, of 28, Devonshire Street, Skipton, have received a letter from their son, Pte. James Whitaker, saying that his brother, Private Richard Dove Whitaker of the West Riding Regiment, has died from wounds in the head, caused by a shell bursting in his dugout. There were two of them in at the time cooking, and his mate was also killed instantly. Pte. Whitaker only lived until he reached the dressing station. He was 32 years of age, and had been out in France a year and nine months. He was formerly employed as a warpdresser by Messrs. Firth and Moorhouse. Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker have two other sons serving, Pte. J.W. Whitaker, of the West Riding Regiment, and Gunner Edgar Whitaker, of the Royal Field Artillery.

17 May 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Pte. J.W. Whitaker Killed

Pte. James W. Whitaker, of the West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whitaker, of 28, Devonshire Street, Skipton, was killed in action on the night of May 3rd. A pal, Pte. A. Foster, late of 10, Dorset Street, Skipton, in a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker states:– “Your son was killed in action on May 3rd, and at the time the Germans were shelling us very badly. I must say it has been a great blow to us all that was with him, and to the friends that knew him. I can honestly say that he was liked by all the boys of the company.” Pte Whitaker, who was 31 years of age, enlisted in October, 1914, and had been out in France three years. He was formerly employed as a loomer and twister by Messrs. Dixon, Park Shed, Skipton. He was a member of the Church Institute, and also of the Conservative Club. About two months ago another brother, Pte. Richard Dove Whitaker, of the West Riding Regiment, was killed in action. Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker have also another son, Pte. Edgar Whitaker, serving in the R.F.A.

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